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20121225
20121225
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the top stories of the year continues. and later, the most memorable moments from mitt romney's run for the white house, for better or for worse. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. there is no mass-produced human. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. comfort individualized. save 50% on the final closeout of our silver limited edition bed plus special financing through new years day. >>> welcome back to "morning joe." we want to continue our conversation on the big stories that shaped the past year. and there were some others, even though the recent events of the past week or so seem to overshadow everything, but why don't we start the john heilemann's choice, of a certain statement that was made at a certain fund-raiser. >> well, before i mention mitt romney's 47% comment, i w
the videotape of mr. romney talking about the 47%. he showed an insight into the candidate. host: why is he a hero? caller: he had the courage to share with others. host: anybody else in congress or in texas? caller: i thought that mr. paul was a class act. host: that was tom from texas. tell us about your political hero. e-mail and twitter. give us a call, 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. they all start with 202 area codes. a lot of comments on facebook and twitter. this comes from twitter. host: she only has 140 characters. wendy from oakland, new jersey. go ahead. caller: hi. i believe the political hero should be hillary clinton. host: why is that? caller: she has kept peace around the world. she has been able to focus on the problems here in america while she is done a tremendous job overseas. host: what would you like to see out of there? caller: become the next president of united states. i think it is a strong possibility. you mentioned travel and keeping people safe. any specific accomplishment that sticks out in your mind? caller: meeting with the pakistan
these loan up photos of ron paul, mitt romney, newt gingrich, show them to people outside the studio figured some would know who ron paul is that everybody would know who mitt romney and newt gingrich are. >> do you know who this is? >> tom brokaw of? >> looks like will ferrell. >> how about this? didn't know who this is? >> the situation. >> is a character in a sleazy reality show but more near him then politicians did >> "the situation." john: thiss one reason they are dumb older rock concerts. many of the young people had no clue of them. it is a fine young people don't vote. most of them don't pay attention and will be less likely to vote. but i take heat for saying that saying some people shouldn't vote is sacrilegious, but when economists agree with me, author of the myth of the rational voter, why democracies choose bad policies. because voters are not rational? >> exactly. john: people want to do the right thing. >> people do want to do the right thing, but that doesn't mean they are doing it. if you try to do the right thing without knowing what you are doing you can easily messed t
the accountants to figure that out. >> governor romney paid 14%, i paid 15, 16, we would be paying 35%. >> you refer to, even as a youth, investing as a game. >> it is a game. >> great game. well, they're playing a dangerous game with investing in washington, in the congress. so my question to you is, if the united states congress, specifically the house of representatives, were a private industry, would you invest in it? would you buy it? >> i think i'd get new management. but i wouldn't give up on the country at all. it's a wonderful country. believe me, 535 people aren't going to screw it up forever for 512 million. >> but they can screw it up momentarily. >> they sure can. >> 1956, you write an article about this little-known -- >> one sentence. >> one sentence. >> it was in an article about another guy. >> this guy in omaha. at what point did the lightbulb go off over your head and said, okay, he's different, he's not only game changer, he's the guy that's going to create a new game? >> well, i may not have been that good, that expansive in my thinking, but i met him first in 1967. my hus
. hello. spent nice to meet you. >> gary johnson? no, no, no, no. you've got to be a romney girl now. >> how are you? good to see you. >> my own newspaper held me over and i was explaining, it's rude to lose your watch in the middle of an interview. it's like a half hour later. spent do you know brian? >> i haven't seen in such a long time. why wouldn't you have me on? we are? that's great, that's great because i will be in new york for that. hello. i will see you later. that was good. do you know who it is dedicated to? >> no. >> it's a crackerjack surprise inside. has your husband read it yet? spent he's busy. leave him alone. >> he changed his e-mail address on the, by the way. spent i don't know what your e-mail is. >> both of you change your e-mail address on it. i hadn't planned to say anything but since i'm late, my publisher, editor at eagle told me it would be polite for me to say something. so i just want to for startup i think it's all human events fault that i was late. that's the most important thing. it's not my fault. and thank you so much for all come tonight. sensual
to get this engine and the economy pumping again. neil: do you think, andthis is mentioned by mitt romney a lot. you know that you are going to do things differently? dubai that? >> everybody talks about reducing taxes because they want more capital to grow their business. but it's also regulatio. businesses are confronted at the township and city level. >> here in chicago, you need 161 licenses to open up the business. >> if you open up a job shop, you have to have a license to ve them a bath. it'sidiculous. why can't we consolidate some of these things and reduce the bureaucracy? it isn't about the people collecting anything but a paycheck. neil: they must realize that the more they push this, the more it it endangers the economy and their very jobs are oine. >> you would think so, when you? there is a lot of evidence that says those people inside the beltway are living in a bubble. washington dc s the only city in the united states that has had taken continuous growthh >> what about when gas comes down? >> you have a gas situation where you have $4000 and their wages have only gone up
election. on november 6th president obama beat republican rival mitt romney to win a second term. what other stories topped the list and what do they tell us about the world we live in today. john fund is a columnist for "national review magazine" he joins us to weigh in on this. john, good to see you. merry christmas to you. >> thank you. kelly: we hope you're doing well. we know the top story was the election, it was a bitter fight to the end, president obama winning re-election. what does it tell us, though, about the campaign of mitt romney, and the mood of the country then, because we had so many other big stories affect the outcome of the election. >> well, this election, i think, was a very curious one, because president obama made some history. normal lee an incumbent with an economy that weak and no particular prospects of it getting better wouldn't have won re-election. but president obama was able to take advantage of i think dramatic stumbles on the part of mitt romney, the 47% line and various other things, absolutely. kelly: does it surprise you that mitt romney's people
was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was george romney whose son has been in the news lately. mitt romney's dad complained ray was not being cooperative. he felt he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might have used fannie mae posted your letter head to raise money for democratic candidates and the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all the fannie mae work related to foreclosures, all the fees. in nine months of taking office nixon hired him -- fired him without giving any public explanation. lapin resisted, said that nixon was turning fannie mae and to what he called a patronage putting. lapin tried to get a restraining order from a federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. beret kept showing up for work anyway. at one point of the lights went out at fannie may's offices and the phone lines went dead. some people at fannie mae interpreted this as a subtle message from the nixon white house. finally gave up and walked away. nixon appointed a new
just heard a newsletter, which said the r. word is not romney, it is republican. this is about a party that is still to become a modern, effective party. part of the answer is suggested the republican national committee works to create a set of debates hosted by the republicans do we tell the media, why would you want -- i participated in the head every time here at the reagan library, but the truth is you ended up in the reagan library with one of the examples. left-wing moderators did their centrist because everybody they know us to their left. [laughter] these are not people who are biased. they represent the center for america because every round they go to cocktail parties at this literally got far to the left. so if you were to go back and analyze questions were putting together right now fascinating case study, which some of you will remember richard stephanopoulos asked this question about the 1963 tidwell versus connecticut supreme court suit involving contraception. i guarantee you, because i was there. every republican candidate and a debate has gone what? relearned a few we
romney. was he extremely filtered? >> guest: unfiltered without a doubt. in historical is not a lot of time in politics. had he won the presidency, he would've been second second only to wilson and arguably grover cleveland in terms of the shortness of his political career before he became president. >> host: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was, but tv signature programs in which authors are interviewed by policymakers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" errors at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> historian harlow giles unger recounts the life of the six president, john quincy adams who died in 1840. quincy adams, second president had a long career, which aside from his presidency 10 years as secretary of state, senator, congressman administered six countries. th
watching chris christie a lot whether it was to do super storm sandy or whether to campaign for mitt romney. there's a lot of question about whether he would get the challenge from the very popular mayor of newark, at least popular in some circles cory booker. >> what's interesting about this is that cory booker put out a web video which is how all the politicians announce these days. he said i'm interested in running for senate. that job isn't actually open at this point. senator frank lautenberg holds that seat, a long-time democrat. he has not telegraphed what he's going to do. when cory booker put out this statement that he was going to run lautenberg said there's a time for politics. it's next year. that's when i'll address it. >> lautenberg is 8 years old. he's in his 80s. he might decide to run. he could be... decide to keep that challenge afloat there. we could either be talking about a democratic primary or booker is very well known. he's got a strong national presence. so this is somebody who could clear the field for the democrats but either way it will be competitive. republican
doesn't think that. but he knows that he's not mitt romney saying 47% of the country are people that i have nothing to do with and i don't care about. he knows that he's the president of the people of the united states which includes 47 percent ironically who voted for mitt romney. and so you know, you have to be able to say, well, why is the first african american man to run for the office of president not willing to say as he's running for president, "oh, and by the way i believe in gay marriage in 2008." i get it. it's easy to understand that. and if what that means is that i have to wait for the day that a president says, "i believe i same sex marriage," i'm willing to wait. and i waited and he said it. this man believes what we believe and i actually got a chance to say this to him. >> to obama? >> that, you know, lincoln at one point in the lincoln-douglas was disappointed when douglas made a particularly racist speech. he said, "stephen knows better than this. he's blown the moral lights out." and that moved me enormously when i read that. the job of the president is both to mak
romney the other night without a speech. so i want to say first that it's such an honor to have been able to be in the same room last night with the finalist who don't need to tell them what extraordinary company they are. this book was done as a labor of love for my husband, who brought me in as a writer, brought me into a rope that i didn't know and made me believe that the stories there could be told. but the work itself was the product of some extraordinary women. it was who believed in me in this book and gave of their time to do it and that is kate medina and london king and all of these ferocious women at random house. i am grateful to them. [applause] i also have to say that this book would not be possible without two other extraordinary women. they are my translators for this project and they risked more than i did to tell the stories. finally, i'm grateful to the courage of the people who allow their stories to be told. if this means anything, i think it's this. that small stories in so-called places matter and one of the reasons that they matter i think is because, because they
obama's becoming or who mitt romney's becoming or who you or i or nora are becoming because that's the character issue that's going to outlast our career. >> i've listened to people on television talk about -- a worry that we're becoming more secular. on the other hand you're expanding -- >> yeah. >> are you worried about where we are as a society and our relationship to religion? >> well, you know one of the big reports that's been reported over and over and over nine months ago "newsweek" had a cover, "the decline and fall of christian america." in december, "newsweek," declines and falls. christianity is going to go on for another 2,000 years. these predictions of the church's demise are highly exaggerated. kingdoms come and gone. where's the syrian empire where's the nozazi regime? things come and go. there's misinterpreting of data. there was a result that came out that said the number of protestants in america i think it was a pugh study, dropped precipitously. of course it does. nobody calls themselves a protestant anymore. i don't know a single person. i
to who these two men are and have no idea what mitt romney's plan for the country was -- you know, a billion citizens united is a disaster, and i talked to jim messina, who was so instrumental in the obama re-election organization. he feels as though -- i hope i am not speaking out of school to say this -- he feels we need a constitutional amendment to protect voters rights and to also protect our collections from the pollution of this amazing amount of money. i agree with bonnie. i do not know if it is an option, but the money is a distraction. it does not to give us good information about who these people are. now, noam chomsky says that the size of a piece of information is to make it as short as it is today is an effective way of censoring, is a censorship to shorten our pieces of information, because it gives us the opportunity to say something that people already know. but the amount of time that it takes to contradict a sort of known perceived consensus of reality and perceived wisdom to disassembled that in to build into someone's mind in an argument an alternative way of
of mitt romney's best surrogates to really putting the people of new jersey, his state, the disaster in the number one place, number one priority and worked with the local and federal authorities, embraced the help that was coming from everywhere, and that has seen him get really high approval ratings. you know, it's funnich sometimes doing the right thing is the politically correct thing to do. >> they say good policy is good politics, vice versa. would be nice if other people on both sides of the aisle followed that. okay, richard. i want to get to your next naughty because these are two republicans who gave republican leaders, the people here i cover, major, major heartburn, you see them there,ed to akin and richard mourdock. >> they became the problems the republicans were having in recapturing the senate. ed to akin, the republican senate candidate from missouri and richard mourdock from minnesota, made offensive remarks about women and rape and todd akin introduce the the concept of so-called legitimate rape, that if there was a legitimate rape, women somehow would not get preg
close attention to who these two men are and have no idea what mitt romney's plan for the country was -- you know, a billion dollars spent on advertising, citizens united is a disaster, and i talked to jim messina, who was so instrumental in the obama re-election organization. he feels as though -- i hope i am not speaking out of school to say this -- he feels we need a constitutional amendment to protect voters rights and to also protect our collections -- elections from the pollution of this amazing amount of money. i agree with bonnie. i do not know if it is an auction, but the money is a distraction. it does not to give us good information about who these people are. now, noam chomsky says that the size of a piece of information is to make it as short as it is today is an effective way of censoring, is a censorship to shorten our pieces of information, because it gives us the opportunity to say something that people already know. but the amount of time that it takes to contradict a sort of known perceived consensus of reality and perceived wisdom to disassemble that and to bui
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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